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Hershel Layton
...The Grand Grimoire. All of this world's magic is contained within its pages.
Grand Grimoire

The Grand Grimoire.

The Grand Grimoire is a gameplay element in Professor Layton vs. Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney. A spellbook given to Phoenix Wright by Hershel Layton, it can be used as a resource for finding information on spells in Labyrinthia, and is used in conjunction with the court record during the witch trials.

GameplayEdit

The "Grand Grimoire" button, which is used by either pressing it with the stylus or tapping the left shoulder button, allows the player to view information regarding Labyrinthia's spells and other forms of witchery. The player is able to flip through the pages with the left and right arrow buttons on the screen or by using the D-pad. Pages in the Grand Grimoire can be presented as with any other evidence.

SpellsEdit

There are many different spells in the book that, throughout the trials, are tabbed and color-coded by Luke Triton and Espella Cantabella in order to find them easily. The player obtains the spells as they go through the trial and the tabs remain for the rest of the game, allowing access to all of the spells that have been used previously. The following spells are referenced in the Grand Grimoire:

There is also the hidden spell "Taelende", which is not contained within the book itself, but rather concealed within the symbols on its cover.

NameEdit

  • A "grimoire" is a book of instructions in the use of magic, while the use of the word "grand" indicates the book's importance.
  • It most likely is in reference to the real Grand Grimoire that was written in the 16th century in order to summon demons and the like with spells, similar to how the Grand Grimoire functions in the game.
  • It is called "Liber Magae" in the German localization, which means "book of magic" in Latin.